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Absurd corpo trash pricing for laptops

Basically the title. I wanna hear everyone's thoughts on this bullshit.

context
Shopping for laptops that can allow for customization while not being so heavy I will literally collapse under the weight and with tough enough shells so I can take on motorcycle and more than ten terrabytes of storage for all my random pirated movies and tv shows and music because fuck netflix.
And they are fuckin expensive.
Like it is far cheaper to buy these parts individually and fabricate using a 3d printer and build a cyberdeck than partake in any of that bullshit.
Wtf.

Anyways, gimme yer thoughts surrounding this crap.
Cyberpunk Hackers GIF
 
>Customization on laptop
A easily replacable battery, storage and ram are the cost efficient customizations. Usually anything over this is just useless and will add insane amounts to the weight and cost without adding any benefits.

>more than 10tb of storage
10TB is just a lot for default storage. You can't get 10tb storage default without spending extreme prices. You should buy 2tb nvme and a 8tb ssd, just about any laptop that came out in last 5 years have at least one sata and one nvme slot. Never ever use hdd's in laptops.

i was in the market for a laptop recently and any enterprise/work laptop was good while anything withhout the work laptop tag was horrible at cost efficiency, i ended up buying a x201 thinkpad because i am a lenovo fanboy with a mild case of poor thought.
For the shopping, always lookout for used, get a good idea of what your budget is and start from 30%=40% below your budget with the idea of upgrading with the money left, closer to your budget, less money on upgrades.
 
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punishedgnome

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Honestly, buy a 3-4 year old laptop on Ebay for $200-$400 that is upgradable if you just want it to watch movies. It's a much better bang for your buck. The only point in buying a new PC is if you need it for gaming or some other resource intense application. You could buy something like a Thinkpad T480, upgrade it to 32-gigs of ram and install a nice big SSD for a fraction of the cost of a new machine that will only perform marginally better for day-to-day tasks.

I also pirate all my shit, and I keep it all on a 2 TB NAS with a separate backup on a 2 TB hard drive in my desktop. 10 TB is a lot of movies and stuff. Like I house hundreds of movies and tv shows on my 2 TB drive, literally thousands and thousands of hours of content. Sometimes you gotta let shit go man. I also find ignoring the 4K meme and just downloading shit in 720p helps a lot too, but that's me. The personal utility you will get from 4k vs 720 or 1080 will vary. I just don't care enough to cough up money for more storage so I can watch 20 year old TV shows and movies in 4k. That's up to you though.
 
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Laptops are garbage, build your own.
laptops represent movement and a dynamic lifestyle, desktops imply being a boring fatso

Honestly, buy a 3-4 year old laptop on Ebay for $200-$400 that is upgradable if you just want it to watch movies. It's a much better bang for your buck. The only point in buying a new PC is if you need it for gaming or some other resource intense application. You could buy something like a Thinkpad T480, upgrade it to 32-gigs of ram and install a nice big SSD for a fraction of the cost of a new machine that will only perform marginally better for day-to-day tasks.

I also pirate all my shit, and I keep it all on a 2 TB NAS with a separate backup on a 2 TB hard drive in my desktop. 10 TB is a lot of movies and stuff. Like I house hundreds of movies and tv shows on my 2 TB drive, literally thousands and thousands of hours of content. Sometimes you gotta let shit go man. I also find ignoring the 4K meme and just downloading shit in 720p helps a lot too, but that's me. The personal utility you will get from 4k vs 720 or 1080 will vary. I just don't care enough to cough up money for more storage so I can watch 20 year old TV shows and movies in 4k. That's up to you though.
Thinkpads also usually have a led above the monitor that lights the keyboard slightly, if such a advanced technology that is several milennium beyond everyone else doesn't make you buy a thinkpad, idk what will.
 
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r_7

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Not sure my opinion matters, but that said, if you can find anything that is supported by https://github.com/n4ru/1vyrain you get yourself a sweet laptop at a reasonable price. Many of those (particularly the T4/W5 series), you can replace a great many parts on the cheap as well as fit 3 drives in most of them...
 
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RisingThumb

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Basically the title. I wanna hear everyone's thoughts on this bullshit.

context
Shopping for laptops that can allow for customization while not being so heavy I will literally collapse under the weight and with tough enough shells so I can take on motorcycle and more than ten terrabytes of storage for all my random pirated movies and tv shows and music because fuck netflix.
And they are fuckin expensive.
Like it is far cheaper to buy these parts individually and fabricate using a 3d printer and build a cyberdeck than partake in any of that bullshit.
Wtf.

Anyways, gimme yer thoughts surrounding this crap.
Cyberpunk Hackers GIF
Get a cheap laptop with 1TB storage, and a microSD card slot or get an external microSD card reader. Then get a bunch of 256GB microSD cards. Alternatively get a bunch of 1TB or 512GB SSDs and use a SATA-USB cable to connect to your laptop, and record on paper what's on what. When you say customisation, what customisations? Your use cases sounds like lightweight, and decent screen, so consider a chromebook since they use aluminium chassis so light and thin, and their screen is acceptable quality. They run some linux distro, but nobody cares, just stick mpv or vlc on it, and connect relevant microSD card or external SSD.

Also consider if you need to be able to portably carry 10TB of movies with you on a motorbike(I use no more than 1TB of media, since I'm unlikely to need it, and most is 720p or 1080p)
 
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r_7

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I'll add, knowing the budget is helpful. You can find a W530 with 32gb of ram for under 350$. The conversion bay to take the cd/dvdrom out is like 10$. 5tb 2.5" internal drives are in the 100$ each range so figure $200 for close to 10tb there internal (lose a bit on formatting etc), there is also room for a nvme drive beyond that (though the bus is kinda slow on that model so it won't be as fast as your typical NVMe drive) but sill you could put your main system on there and probably be fine.

If you need like bleeding edge wifi (talking latest latest, works fine out of the box with almost everything), you can replace the wireless module on that model for like $38, they are dumb easy to replace. So for about $560, there might be some shipping involved so call it a cool $600, and your dream can be real (all be it with spinning disks so ya know, nothing is perfect, I suggest turning the thing off, and having a decent case to put it in).

All the above can be had cheaper I'm certain but, that was just a quick above the fold look at what's available right now.

Oh and replacement batteries are dumb cheap as well...
 
I'll add, knowing the budget is helpful. You can find a W530 with 32gb of ram for under 350$. The conversion bay to take the cd/dvdrom out is like 10$. 5tb 2.5" internal drives are in the 100$ each range so figure $200 for close to 10tb there internal (lose a bit on formatting etc), there is also room for a nvme drive beyond that (though the bus is kinda slow on that model so it won't be as fast as your typical NVMe drive) but sill you could put your main system on there and probably be fine.

If you need like bleeding edge wifi (talking latest latest, works fine out of the box with almost everything), you can replace the wireless module on that model for like $38, they are dumb easy to replace. So for about $560, there might be some shipping involved so call it a cool $600, and your dream can be real (all be it with spinning disks so ya know, nothing is perfect, I suggest turning the thing off, and having a decent case to put it in).

All the above can be had cheaper I'm certain but, that was just a quick above the fold look at what's available right now.

Oh and replacement batteries are dumb cheap as well...
I reckon a budget of ~$2000-3000 usd would be enough, probably. Need something relatively powerful. But yeah cheers for the info.
 
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RisingThumb

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I reckon a budget of ~$2000-3000 usd would be enough, probably. Need something relatively powerful. But yeah cheers for the info.
It might be a bit unusual, but have you considered a steam deck? Has a microSD slot, is Linux, can be used like a desktop PC if you want, or like a handheld for in bed and on the go and stuff. The microSD slot allows large storage, and you can get one of those small containers for lots of microSD cards too. Alternatively if you need true customisability, look at making a desktop PC that's properly portable, like this https://fabiensanglard.net/mjolnir/index.html
 
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It might be a bit unusual, but have you considered a steam deck? Has a microSD slot, is Linux, can be used like a desktop PC if you want, or like a handheld for in bed and on the go and stuff. The microSD slot allows large storage, and you can get one of those small containers for lots of microSD cards too. Alternatively if you need true customisability, look at making a desktop PC that's properly portable, like this https://fabiensanglard.net/mjolnir/index.html
looks pretty easy to rip apart and make into something more powerful
 

InsufferableCynic

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I tend to buy super low-end laptops (since I mainly use them for programming in vim, don't really need much in the way of graphics or storage) and I have found that they have essentially stagnated. They are selling the same super-low end garbage from 5 years ago (64GB eMMC, 4GB Ram, 11-13' screen), but now it's the same price (or more) than it was 5 years ago. It's absolute madness.

My HP Stream 13 (which is actually great by the way) from 5 years ago still works and I got it for much, much cheaper than an equivalent laptop is now. Even though I bought the display model, so got it for about $150, it was a $350 laptop back then. Now the same laptop if $500
 
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You should really build a NAS for storage, I don't even know what I'd do with 10TB of storage but if you already need that much I assume you'll eventually need more. It's going to be easier to have a dedicated box you remote into (and add another drive into) than continuously churning larger HDDs in your laptop.
 
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ALRIGHTY so here is an idea, tell me how fucking stupid it is and what needs to be fixed up in this outline. Also a NAS sounds like a good option for additional storage, thx

wearyinternettraveler.​


guide le cyberdeck:

  1. Processor: AMD Ryzen 9 3900X 3.8 GHz 12-Core Processor
  2. Cooling: Corsair H50 57 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler
  3. Motherboard: Asus ROG Crosshair VIII Impact Mini DTX AM4 Motherboard
  4. Memory: Crucial Ballistix MAX 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-5100 CL19 Memory
  5. Storage: Corsair MP600 PRO NH 8 TB M.2-2280 PCIe 4.0 X4 NVME Solid State Drive
  6. Video Card: PNY T-Series T1000 8GB 8 GB Video Card
  7. Batteries: 3 x 15.4V 90Wh batteries ASU3269 High Quality Asus Li-Polymer Battery Pack
  8. Main Display: ElecLab Raspberry Pi Touchscreen Monitor 7.4 Inch HDMI Capacitive LCD Display 1280x400
  9. Secondary Display: G-STORY 15.6" 165Hz Portable Monitor
  10. Wi-Fi: TP-Link Archer TX20U 802.11a/b/g/n/ac/ax USB Type-A Wi-Fi Adapter
  11. Sound Card: Creative Labs Sound Blaster AE-9 32-bit 384 kHz Sound Card



Once you have gathered all the components, it is time to start assembling the internal components of your custom cyberdeck. Here are the steps for assembly:

  1. Install the AMD Ryzen 9 3900X Processor on the Asus ROG Crosshair VIII Impact Mini DTX AM4 Motherboard. Make sure to follow the instructions provided in the processor manual to securely attach the processor to the motherboard.
  • Mount the Corsair H50 57 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler on the processor. This will help to keep the processor cool during operation.
  • Install the Crucial Ballistix MAX 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-5100 CL19 Memory on the motherboard. Make sure to follow the instructions provided in the memory manual to securely attach the memory modules to the motherboard.
  • Connect the Corsair MP600 PRO NH 8 TB M.2-2280 PCIe 4.0 X4 NVME Solid State Drive to the motherboard. This will provide fast and efficient storage for your cyberdeck.
  • Install the PNY T-Series T1000 8GB 8 GB Video Card in the appropriate slot on the motherboard. Make sure to securely attach the video card to the motherboard.
  • Connect the TP-Link Archer TX20U 802.11a/b/g/n/ac/ax USB Type-A Wi-Fi Adapter to an available USB port. This will allow your cyberdeck to connect to wireless networks.
  • Install the Creative Labs Sound Blaster AE-9 32-bit 384 kHz Sound Card in an available PCIe slot. This will provide high-quality audio for your cyberdeck.
Once you have assembled the internal components, it is time to connect the batteries. Here are the steps:

To connect four Li-Polymer Battery Packs with 15.4V capacity and 90Wh each to power a system requiring 250W, you would need to connect the batteries in parallel, with each battery providing a capacity of 90Wh and a voltage of 15.4V.

Here are the steps to connect the batteries in parallel:

  1. Take 4 battery packs and connect the positive terminal of the first battery pack to the positive terminal of the second battery pack using a thick wire.
  2. Connect the positive terminal of the second battery pack to the positive terminal of the third battery pack using a thick wire.
  3. Connect the positive terminal of the third battery pack to the positive terminal of the fourth battery pack using a thick wire.
  4. Connect the negative terminal of the first battery pack to the negative terminal of the second battery pack using a thick wire.
  5. Connect the negative terminal of the second battery pack to the negative terminal of the third battery pack using a thick wire.
  6. Connect the negative terminal of the third battery pack to the negative terminal of the fourth battery pack using a thick wire.
  7. The positive terminal of the resulting parallel battery pack should be connected to the positive terminal of the system, and the negative terminal of the resulting parallel battery pack should be connected to the negative terminal of the system.
By connecting the batteries in parallel, you would have a combined voltage of 15.4V and a capacity of 360Wh, which should be enough to power a system requiring 250W, as long as you are mindful of the battery's discharge rate. It's important to keep in mind that batteries have a limited number of charge cycles, so it's important to avoid over-discharging them or discharging them below their minimum voltage levels. Additionally, it's important to properly manage the battery temperature and charge levels to ensure safe and optimal operation.

The next step is to 3D print the case for your custom cyberdeck. Here are the steps:

  1. Design the case in a 3D modeling software such as Tinkercad or Fusion 360. The case should be 35 cm wide x 17 cm deep (including bezels for fold-up screen and the slide out slots for secondary screens) x 6 cm thick.
  2. The case should include a mechanism to hold and secure the ElecLab Raspberry Pi Touchscreen Monitors 7.4 Inch HDMI Capacitive LCD Display 1280x400 and the G-STORY 15.6" 165Hz Portable Monitor.
  3. Print the case on a 3D printer using a strong and durable material such as ABS or PETG.
The next step is to 3D print the case for your custom cyberdeck. The following steps will guide you through the process:

Design the case in a 3D modeling software such as Tinkercad or Fusion 360. The case should be 35 cm wide x 17 cm deep (including bezels for fold-up screen and the slide out slots for secondary screens) x 6 cm thick. The case should include a mechanism to hold and secure the ElecLab Raspberry Pi Touchscreen Monitors 7.4 Inch HDMI Capacitive LCD Display 1280x400 and the G-STORY 15.6" 165Hz Portable Monitor. Print the case on a 3D printer using a strong and durable material such as ABS or PETG.

Step 5: Install the Monitors Once the case is 3D printed, it's time to install the monitors: Mount the ElecLab Raspberry Pi Touch screen Monitor and the G-STORY 15.6" 165Hz Portable Monitor in the case, making sure they are securely held in place. Connect the monitors to the motherboard using the appropriate cables. Make sure the secondary display can slide out from behind the central display with scratching.

Step 6: Install the Operating System The final step is to install an operating system on the cyberdeck. Options: Arch, Gentoo, or Kali.
 

RisingThumb

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  1. Cooling: Corsair H50 57 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler
If this gets damaged in a motorbike trip, that's $3000 flushed away. Also look at the weight of all those components, add it up and ask yourself if you really want to be lugging all that around with you in your backpack? Not that it's not cool, but imo a bit impractical
 
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ALRIGHTY so here is an idea, tell me how fucking stupid it is and what needs to be fixed up in this outline. Also a NAS sounds like a good option for additional storage, thx

wearyinternettraveler.​


guide le cyberdeck:

  1. Processor: AMD Ryzen 9 3900X 3.8 GHz 12-Core Processor
  2. Cooling: Corsair H50 57 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler
  3. Motherboard: Asus ROG Crosshair VIII Impact Mini DTX AM4 Motherboard
  4. Memory: Crucial Ballistix MAX 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-5100 CL19 Memory
  5. Storage: Corsair MP600 PRO NH 8 TB M.2-2280 PCIe 4.0 X4 NVME Solid State Drive
  6. Video Card: PNY T-Series T1000 8GB 8 GB Video Card
  7. Batteries: 3 x 15.4V 90Wh batteries ASU3269 High Quality Asus Li-Polymer Battery Pack
  8. Main Display: ElecLab Raspberry Pi Touchscreen Monitor 7.4 Inch HDMI Capacitive LCD Display 1280x400
  9. Secondary Display: G-STORY 15.6" 165Hz Portable Monitor
  10. Wi-Fi: TP-Link Archer TX20U 802.11a/b/g/n/ac/ax USB Type-A Wi-Fi Adapter
  11. Sound Card: Creative Labs Sound Blaster AE-9 32-bit 384 kHz Sound Card



Once you have gathered all the components, it is time to start assembling the internal components of your custom cyberdeck. Here are the steps for assembly:

  1. Install the AMD Ryzen 9 3900X Processor on the Asus ROG Crosshair VIII Impact Mini DTX AM4 Motherboard. Make sure to follow the instructions provided in the processor manual to securely attach the processor to the motherboard.
  • Mount the Corsair H50 57 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler on the processor. This will help to keep the processor cool during operation.
  • Install the Crucial Ballistix MAX 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-5100 CL19 Memory on the motherboard. Make sure to follow the instructions provided in the memory manual to securely attach the memory modules to the motherboard.
  • Connect the Corsair MP600 PRO NH 8 TB M.2-2280 PCIe 4.0 X4 NVME Solid State Drive to the motherboard. This will provide fast and efficient storage for your cyberdeck.
  • Install the PNY T-Series T1000 8GB 8 GB Video Card in the appropriate slot on the motherboard. Make sure to securely attach the video card to the motherboard.
  • Connect the TP-Link Archer TX20U 802.11a/b/g/n/ac/ax USB Type-A Wi-Fi Adapter to an available USB port. This will allow your cyberdeck to connect to wireless networks.
  • Install the Creative Labs Sound Blaster AE-9 32-bit 384 kHz Sound Card in an available PCIe slot. This will provide high-quality audio for your cyberdeck.
Once you have assembled the internal components, it is time to connect the batteries. Here are the steps:

To connect four Li-Polymer Battery Packs with 15.4V capacity and 90Wh each to power a system requiring 250W, you would need to connect the batteries in parallel, with each battery providing a capacity of 90Wh and a voltage of 15.4V.

Here are the steps to connect the batteries in parallel:

  1. Take 4 battery packs and connect the positive terminal of the first battery pack to the positive terminal of the second battery pack using a thick wire.
  2. Connect the positive terminal of the second battery pack to the positive terminal of the third battery pack using a thick wire.
  3. Connect the positive terminal of the third battery pack to the positive terminal of the fourth battery pack using a thick wire.
  4. Connect the negative terminal of the first battery pack to the negative terminal of the second battery pack using a thick wire.
  5. Connect the negative terminal of the second battery pack to the negative terminal of the third battery pack using a thick wire.
  6. Connect the negative terminal of the third battery pack to the negative terminal of the fourth battery pack using a thick wire.
  7. The positive terminal of the resulting parallel battery pack should be connected to the positive terminal of the system, and the negative terminal of the resulting parallel battery pack should be connected to the negative terminal of the system.
By connecting the batteries in parallel, you would have a combined voltage of 15.4V and a capacity of 360Wh, which should be enough to power a system requiring 250W, as long as you are mindful of the battery's discharge rate. It's important to keep in mind that batteries have a limited number of charge cycles, so it's important to avoid over-discharging them or discharging them below their minimum voltage levels. Additionally, it's important to properly manage the battery temperature and charge levels to ensure safe and optimal operation.

The next step is to 3D print the case for your custom cyberdeck. Here are the steps:

  1. Design the case in a 3D modeling software such as Tinkercad or Fusion 360. The case should be 35 cm wide x 17 cm deep (including bezels for fold-up screen and the slide out slots for secondary screens) x 6 cm thick.
  2. The case should include a mechanism to hold and secure the ElecLab Raspberry Pi Touchscreen Monitors 7.4 Inch HDMI Capacitive LCD Display 1280x400 and the G-STORY 15.6" 165Hz Portable Monitor.
  3. Print the case on a 3D printer using a strong and durable material such as ABS or PETG.
The next step is to 3D print the case for your custom cyberdeck. The following steps will guide you through the process:

Design the case in a 3D modeling software such as Tinkercad or Fusion 360. The case should be 35 cm wide x 17 cm deep (including bezels for fold-up screen and the slide out slots for secondary screens) x 6 cm thick. The case should include a mechanism to hold and secure the ElecLab Raspberry Pi Touchscreen Monitors 7.4 Inch HDMI Capacitive LCD Display 1280x400 and the G-STORY 15.6" 165Hz Portable Monitor. Print the case on a 3D printer using a strong and durable material such as ABS or PETG.

Step 5: Install the Monitors Once the case is 3D printed, it's time to install the monitors: Mount the ElecLab Raspberry Pi Touch screen Monitor and the G-STORY 15.6" 165Hz Portable Monitor in the case, making sure they are securely held in place. Connect the monitors to the motherboard using the appropriate cables. Make sure the secondary display can slide out from behind the central display with scratching.

Step 6: Install the Operating System The final step is to install an operating system on the cyberdeck. Options: Arch, Gentoo, or Kali.
you realise this build will weight insane, will be fragile, have low battery life and will cost more than the average work laptop, right? The only positives are it will perform insanely well and will be quiet. If i was as rich as you are, i would just buy/assembly a thinkpad X2100
 
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Regal

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  1. Processor: AMD Ryzen 9 3900X 3.8 GHz 12-Core Processor
  2. Cooling: Corsair H50 57 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler
  3. Motherboard: Asus ROG Crosshair VIII Impact Mini DTX AM4 Motherboard
  4. Memory: Crucial Ballistix MAX 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-5100 CL19 Memory
  5. Storage: Corsair MP600 PRO NH 8 TB M.2-2280 PCIe 4.0 X4 NVME Solid State Drive
  6. Video Card: PNY T-Series T1000 8GB 8 GB Video Card
  7. Batteries: 3 x 15.4V 90Wh batteries ASU3269 High Quality Asus Li-Polymer Battery Pack
  8. Main Display: ElecLab Raspberry Pi Touchscreen Monitor 7.4 Inch HDMI Capacitive LCD Display 1280x400
  9. Secondary Display: G-STORY 15.6" 165Hz Portable Monitor
  10. Wi-Fi: TP-Link Archer TX20U 802.11a/b/g/n/ac/ax USB Type-A Wi-Fi Adapter
  11. Sound Card: Creative Labs Sound Blaster AE-9 32-bit 384 kHz Sound Card

Bruh, you started this thread complaining about "absurd corpo pricing" and then your conclusion was to build this monster? Listen to the other guys above me.

I'm rocking a M1 Macbook Air. Battery life is over a week idle and a little less than that with use. Reasonably durable shell. Good screen. Sounds like a M-series Macbook Air or Pro could meet your needs alongside an external SSD. And all this is a third of the cost of what you're trying to do with none of the headache.
 

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