Cultural changes you've noticed in your lifetime

ZinRicky

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legalizing personal use of marijuana while also not allowing official stores to open would be a way a politician could play both sides. I.e. It addresses the racial tensions that have surrounded this issue, but it appeases conservatives by not openly supporting the use of marijuana.
I'm not American, but if I know something it is that conservatives would not be pleased with anything but a strong prohibition because rich people can do almost what they want since they can pay themself out of prison (source: here in Italy it's the same thing)
So that tactic isn't going to cut it
 
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LostintheCycle

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Internet privacy is a thing of the past. I remember as a kid we all learned in ICT class a lot about being private and whatnot, not signing up to websites or whatever, and be careful what you post. Good initiatives, even if the classes were bloody boring. Did they stop doing that now? because I'm seeing so many kids who have social media now. It isn't hard to imagine a ten year old girl on TikTok anymore even, whereas when we were twelve, we were all fawning over the one or two kids who were daring enough to have a Facebook account. On any social media, when we were kids we were all fairly careful even if we got lax as we got older, but now kids don't do that. I wish I could show people just how easy it actually is to find out information about people based on scraps of info: once someone I knew moved houses, and a friend of mine found out their exact address from his sister's latest bathroom selfie, plus some area estimation, online property listing information, etc... no mainframe computer whiz hacking or whatever, it's literally just playing digital detective with voluntarily given information. I've found various peoples accounts across sites using bits like handle names, interests, etc, and I know I'm not the only one who does this. Sometimes you don't even have to try. My niece made a Wattpad, obviously meant to be secret because it was full of rants, under her FULL FUCKING NAME and LINKED TO HER FACEBOOK. She is like eleven, so she's not stupid or anything. Just, no awareness of digital privacy?

I think this is because in my childhood, the Internet was still like another place instead of occupying the same space as our own lives as it does now. It was never like that for these new kids, they were always living in the Internet when they came onto it, which for them was still like 9 or something. The next batch of kids will have been connected since they were 2.

Addendum: Another interesting change is the presence of watched media in our lives has changed from being something set out by say, a television network to appeal to many people, to a service that provides anything you want, as much as you want. I remember as a kid checking out TV programs to see when a show I like would be on, missing out on a particular morning cartoon because I slept in, etc. whereas my brother just wakes up in the morning, goes and puts whatever on Netflix. He fucking churns through whole seasons like nobodies business, and he's five. Those experiences are worlds apart, and as you can probably tell, I don't think it's a very positive change mostly for kids growing up with this ability. Adults can do whatever they like for all I care.
 
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elia925-6

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Japanese anything is far more accessible and socially acceptable. Their media has made a huge mainstream jump from simply being niche weird cartoons for teenage faggots to normie shows and comics that people watch in theatres abd buy at any bookstore.
But aside from that, people seem far more despondent then they used to, there's an overwhelming feeling of depression and apathy that genuinely makes being with company uncomfortable if you dwell on it too long.
Or parents calling those shows satanic and ban toys in schools which is kinda ironic since it's a place where socialization aspect is important.
 
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JihyoParkXX

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The tolerance towards edginess has significantly decreased the past few years and you get to be called out more often if you're politically incorrect. I remember in 2016 when I first created my Instagram account and a lot of the memes were really edgy. The 'Golden Era of Youtube' also came and went with creators like Filthy Frank and Idubbbz, the latter of which is now a hypocrite and a shell of his former self.

An anon on 4chan said it best with "back then when someone called you a f@ggot you call them a n!gger right back".
 
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InsufferableCynic

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I know, especially if you don't have good background in C++, Image processing and software engineering. The UE is not beginner friendly and the source code is available on GitHub.
I do have experience with all of those and still prefer Unity because of how much easier it is to work with, especially with other people. Also Unreal's weird version of C++ is extremely domain specific and annoying to work with, Unity uses bog-standard C# with some minor changes (like using UnityEngine.Random.Range rather than System.Random)

But really, even if UE is on Github, they still force you to join a group to use it. It's a perfect example of "just because the source is available doesn't mean you have any freedom whatsoever to use or modify it". Putting it on GitHub is a token gesture, nothing else. And it's caused them problems, like the "reply all" fiasco from a few weeks ago.

The tolerance towards edginess has significantly decreased the past few years and you get to be called out more often if you're politically incorrect. I remember in 2016 when I first created my Instagram account and a lot of the memes were really edgy. The 'Golden Era of Youtube' also came and went with creators like Filthy Frank and Idubbbz, the latter of which is now a hypocrite and a shell of his former self.

An anon on 4chan said it best with "back then when someone called you a f@ggot you call them a n!gger right back".

The weirdest part is, everything nowadays is trying to be edgy. Just look at superhero movies for an example. They used to be all colourful, silly, dumb comedy/action films, and now they are all dark, depressing and serious. Everything seems to have gone that way. Hope no longer exists anymore, all the good guys are just less-evil bad guys, and media in general repeatedly tells us that everything is shit and that we should all give up and that life is meaningless and terrible.

But then you say a bad word and people ban you.

Our society is completely choc full of "corporate approved" edginess. Which is the worst kind.

Adults can watch cartoons comfortably and its not longer considered as children's stuff.

I have not found a single "adult cartoon" that isn't for manchildren. The simpsons was probably the last cleverly written, sophisticated adult cartoon and it died a decade ago.

It's why they are so acceptable now. Nothing changed, their audience just got older.

Don't say "rick and morty" or I will drive to your house and slap you for having a wrong opinion.

* Big corporations embracing open source software mainly Microsoft and Valve.
* The gap between portable and tv consoles is closing in terms of software and hardware thanks to Nintedno Switch. You can even run proper linux on Steam Deck and i like how they made a teardown video to demostate the users.

I really hate to be that asshole online, but both of these opinions are misguided.

Microsoft and Valve are really only pretending to embrace open source. Both of them still maintain a core product base of closed source software (Steam in Valves case, Windows in Microsofts case), and are mostly using open source as a corporate weapon. Valve wants to go open because they don't want to be tied to Windows, and the only way to do that is to funnel money into making games work on Linux, and Microsoft is countering by trying to take over and destroy Linux. It's why Microsoft never really releases anything of value as open source, they just make it easier to do Microsoft-controlled development on Linux (like open-sourcing the .NET Framework, which only really benefits Microsoft in the long run).

I would say Valve is probably more genuine than Microsoft about it. I have no doubt there are people at Valve who genuinely care about gaming on Linux, and who want to make it work the best it can because they are fans of free software. But when projects like SteamVR have basically been abandoned on Linux (it doesn't even have proper single-pass instancing working), when flagship games like Alyx take over a year from release to work properly on Linux, and when overall they are still adding most features to Steam in a proprietary fashion, with the only real exceptions being that their big open source contributions are Proton and gaming compatibility with Linux, it's pretty clear what their corporate goals are.

Microsoft really has no interest in promiting free software. They have already lost the Server war to Linux, now their only hope is to get people onto their shitty version of Linux that they control, which has been an abysmal failure because Linux users don't trust Microsoft (and for good reason). When they are still locking things like DirectX to Windows, and making the open source community have to play catchup with projects like DXVK with no help from Microsoft, it's obvious what their corporate goals are as well.

Don't be fooled. No company wants you to be free or have an option to use someone elses products. They all want to lock you in. Sometimes, supporting open source furthers that goal in a twisted, strange way. That's the only time companies will ever support it. Don't fall into the trap of thinking they give a single shit about community driven free software, other than seeing it as a threat to their business model.

As for gaming consoles, the main reason they are getting closer has nothing really to do with the Switch. The reality is most TV consoles now are extremely underpowered and overpriced, and that has largely allowed handhelds to catch up. That said, the handheld market is effectively dead at this point. The Switch and the Deck are the only 2 real competitors that aren't one-off Indie projects, Nintendo has the advantage because they can convince developers to port real games to their glorified tablet by stripping away a lot of the graphics from these games, and the Deck is largely using new hardware to perform reasonably well, but handhelds aren't really a thing anymore. The real battleground in gaming is between TV consoles and PCs, which TV consoles are handily losing due to the fact that every generation is usually worse than the previous. Sure, you get better graphics, but with each generation you get more lock-in, more features taken away and paywalled, less third party support, and generally a worse experience. I expect the PS5/XBSX generation to be the last real generation of home consoles as a result, as more and more people are going to say "fuck this", buy a $500 PC, and game on that instead, with games they know they will be able to keep/play forever without needing some cloud garbage, and free features that aren't constantly getting paywalled. My dumb housemate who has never had a PC in his life is thinking of getting one because the PS5 is getting so frustrating with the constant money grubbing and endless downloading he has to do when he just wants to play some games.

Internet privacy is a thing of the past. I remember as a kid we all learned in ICT class a lot about being private and whatnot, not signing up to websites or whatever, and be careful what you post. Good initiatives, even if the classes were bloody boring. Did they stop doing that now? because I'm seeing so many kids who have social media now. It isn't hard to imagine a ten year old girl on TikTok anymore even, whereas when we were twelve, we were all fawning over the one or two kids who were daring enough to have a Facebook account. On any social media, when we were kids we were all fairly careful even if we got lax as we got older, but now kids don't do that. I wish I could show people just how easy it actually is to find out information about people based on scraps of info: once someone I knew moved houses, and a friend of mine found out their exact address from his sister's latest bathroom selfie, plus some area estimation, online property listing information, etc... no mainframe computer whiz hacking or whatever, it's literally just playing digital detective with voluntarily given information. I've found various peoples accounts across sites using bits like handle names, interests, etc, and I know I'm not the only one who does this. Sometimes you don't even have to try. My niece made a Wattpad, obviously meant to be secret because it was full of rants, under her FULL FUCKING NAME and LINKED TO HER FACEBOOK. She is like eleven, so she's not stupid or anything. Just, no awareness of digital privacy?
I don't think it's a lack of awareness. Privacy being important and "big tech" being bad are so shoved down our throats these days from everything from concerned parents to politicians, there's pretty much nobody of any age who doesn't know the dangers. The problem is that people don't care and don't see it as a problem. In fact, being private online can be a detriment in the attention-seeking mentality of social media - you want all the clout for yourself, not for some pseudononymous avatar you created.

I think people are so used to having freedom in their daily lives that they take it completely for granted, especially in the west, and don't think ahead about how this will affect them in the future.

Worse, the way we approach teaching kids about online privacy is all fear-mongering. It's all about "don't go on forums because you will find child molesters" or "you'll get a virus if you go to dodgy sites", virtually nobody is teaching about the actual social dangers of expressing yourself, especially in the modern cancel culture of the internet. People don't realise that everything they say under their real name is permanent, even if they delete it, and can (and will) be used against them at any time it becomes convenient to do so.

I guess people are also naive enough to think that THEY are the ones with the correct opinions, and that public thought will never turn against them because THEY are on the correct side of history, so there's no need to watch what they say because it will always be agreeable.

Personally, I always approach privacy education from a perspective of control. You don't want to use social media because they can tailor content in a certain way to change how you think. You don't want to use proprietary locked-down solutions like iPhone because you're effectively at the mercy of the manufacturer, and they can set the terms for both the hardware (which usually manifests in dictating the rules for repair and maintenance of the device), as well as the software (which usually manifests in remote removal of "disagreeable" software or software that has a licensing issue, removing things from their storefront, and blocking users etc). By educating people about self-hosted solutions, like how to run a home server, how to root their phone and run a custom rom, etc, I am teaching them how to regain control of their technology. When they do this, privacy comes naturally, as by not using these systems you are naturally not giving them your data either.

Honestly, control is a MUCH larger and more important issue these days than privacy, and it's the sort of issue where we can show tangible, every day effects, whereas privacy is a much harder sell because it usually comes down to "this group you despise got censored" (which most people will see as a good thing anyway, and something that can't happen to them), or some hand-waivey wishy washy argument about how government and companies can do Bad Things™ with their data, like automated policing, which are still in their infancy and used rarely, so most people see it as conspiracy nonesense.

I think this is because in my childhood, the Internet was still like another place instead of occupying the same space as our own lives as it does now. It was never like that for these new kids, they were always living in the Internet when they came onto it, which for them was still like 9 or something. The next batch of kids will have been connected since they were 2.

It was mostly because of the hysteria around this new internet space being filled with murderers, pedos, and other undesirables. Parents wised up like they did with video games, which are also now accepted for the same reasons.


Addendum: Another interesting change is the presence of watched media in our lives has changed from being something set out by say, a television network to appeal to many people, to a service that provides anything you want, as much as you want. I remember as a kid checking out TV programs to see when a show I like would be on, missing out on a particular morning cartoon because I slept in, etc. whereas my brother just wakes up in the morning, goes and puts whatever on Netflix. He fucking churns through whole seasons like nobodies business, and he's five. Those experiences are worlds apart, and as you can probably tell, I don't think it's a very positive change mostly for kids growing up with this ability. Adults can do whatever they like for all I care.
Yeah, it has gotten much worse under this model too, because it becomes super easy to waste days binging shows you're not that super interested in but which were recommended to you by the algorithm™
 
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zerocool

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I was born in the mid 80s. I dont really remember much before about 1992 to tell you the truth. I dont think there is any record in existence today of what my voice sounded like as a kid. We didnt have video cameras and if we did I'd have no way to play any of that with today's tech! There are maybe a couple hundred photos of my life before the age of about 7. The other day my brother sent me an album of ~300 photos and 20 videos of his kids summer party. I guess I'll add these to the 10's of thousands of other clips and photos we have of them growing up. The sheer volume of data captured about kids lives these days far outstrips anything we had. I dont know that that's a good thing. Many things are best left in the past. I'm not even talking about putting your kids entire lives up on social media before they can even talk to give concent to that.

The other thing I've noticed so much now is how fast and convenient everything is. 100 years ago we were still basically having to grow our own food to feed ourselves. In the 80s/90s we at least had freezers but we'd still go shopping regularly for food, it took time and it was a planned trip for the day. These days I can take a device out of my pocket and in 15 mins arrange a delivery of 100,000 calories of refrigerated groceries to be delivered to my door just a couple of hours later. All paid with a square of plastic with a magic number that removes some numbers from my digital bank account, I suppose we call that money, but I have never seen or touched it with my own hands. That is mind blowing when you think about it.
 

InsufferableCynic

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I was born in the mid 80s. I dont really remember much before about 1992 to tell you the truth. I dont think there is any record in existence today of what my voice sounded like as a kid. We didnt have video cameras and if we did I'd have no way to play any of that with today's tech! There are maybe a couple hundred photos of my life before the age of about 7. The other day my brother sent me an album of ~300 photos and 20 videos of his kids summer party. I guess I'll add these to the 10's of thousands of other clips and photos we have of them growing up. The sheer volume of data captured about kids lives these days far outstrips anything we had. I dont know that that's a good thing. Many things are best left in the past. I'm not even talking about putting your kids entire lives up on social media before they can even talk to give concent to that.

I've noticed that as the number of pictures goes up, the quality of pictures goes down.

I remember when my mum went to the UK, she took lots of photos. She came home with a big box of reels. Which was probably 300-400 photos total for a 3 week trip. All of them were well shot, artistic, and well framed.

Now people take 300 photos at a random day out to the city, and 99% of them are badly shot selfies or duckface pictures

The other thing I've noticed so much now is how fast and convenient everything is. 100 years ago we were still basically having to grow our own food to feed ourselves. In the 80s/90s we at least had freezers but we'd still go shopping regularly for food, it took time and it was a planned trip for the day. These days I can take a device out of my pocket and in 15 mins arrange a delivery of 100,000 calories of refrigerated groceries to be delivered to my door just a couple of hours later. All paid with a square of plastic with a magic number that removes some numbers from my digital bank account, I suppose we call that money, but I have never seen or touched it with my own hands. That is mind blowing when you think about it.

Yeah, the economy stopped existing around 2000. Now it's in freefall as a result, and nobody has noticed.
 

scaldanon

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geek culture in particular has changed beyond all recognition. it used to be underground hackers, pirates, people who actually cared to learn what they were doing. now its entirely >redditcostanzayeahrightsmirk-type manchildren who swallow the official narrative on any possible issue and skim across the surface of the most absolutely mainstream thing, proudly shilling for corporate daddy whenever possible.

hot take: gatekeeping is good, actually.
 

VaporwaveHistorian

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The sense of community, at least where I'm at, has disappeared. Might be the younger folk moving to the city instead of staying here. I don't blame anyone, this place is small and I have moved out for education as well. I like close-knit communities because that's how humans are supposed to be. We have evidence (skeletons, remains etc) from ancient times that prove sick people were cared for. If I recall correctly, there was a child skeleton buried with his chair because he was unable to walk due to a disability and was not actually supposed to make it to the age he died. It was all the efforts of the community. People simply didn't think that human life "isn't worth it". Supporting someone in the community was everything.

Now, people will get mad at you for calling someone a "cripple", but they won't do shit to support disabled people. All fucking language politics. People rarely offer me a fucking seat in the subway even when I lack balance like a straw in a hurricane (with a fucking cane in my hand). However, they're the same ones who say "don't say cripple!". Man, I'd rather be called a cripple and receive help rather than listen to very politically correct eugenics enthusiasts (-people love to debate aborting disabled kids next to me for some reason).
 
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RisingThumb

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LAN gaming isn't as common.
LAN board gaming isn't as common.
LAN TTRPG gaming isn't as common.

LAN anything isn't as common. Plus more people flake out nowadays. Especially the younger people
 
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MorphedSnowman

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LAN gaming isn't as common.
LAN board gaming isn't as common.
LAN TTRPG gaming isn't as common.

LAN anything isn't as common. Plus more people flake out nowadays. Especially the younger people
Split screen gaming too has extremely declined. Which is a shame because I always found it more fun to play with someone next to me. I have so many good memories from that, and while doing it online with a mic is still fun, the exprience doesn't compare. Lot of laughs I had were because there were people around me which resulted in some very funny moments. I remember atacking my brother with tickles after losing from him or sharing chips with friends during a game. That is impossible digitally.
 
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Deleted member 4579

Awesome posts in this thread so far, and excellent points I hadn't considered.

I'm kinda surprised no one pointed this out yet though:


Weed's public perception has evolved rapidly, from something only done by degenerates and rebels, to a pain reliever for chronic pain sufferers — which then, of course, opened the way for recreational use to be seen as a normal pastime.

It's especially normalized in towns where it's been legalized for a while.

Not only does everyone I know smoke it, but their parents, who had previously been viciously opposed to their kids' smoking it, have since given in and taken up the habit themselves.

I wonder if weed is here to stay like alcohol, or if it'll eventually get so out of hand it'll become illegal again?
I'm interested to see where this general phenomenon goes with harder drugs, especially psychedelics. Everyone is slowly realizing that people will do the drugs anyways, but if you legalize them their purity can be regulated and taxes can be collected. Crippling the cartels is just a bonus.
 

InsufferableCynic

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geek culture in particular has changed beyond all recognition. it used to be underground hackers, pirates, people who actually cared to learn what they were doing. now its entirely >redditcostanzayeahrightsmirk-type manchildren who swallow the official narrative on any possible issue and skim across the surface of the most absolutely mainstream thing, proudly shilling for corporate daddy whenever possible.

hot take: gatekeeping is good, actually.
Worse actually

Geek Culture became gadget culture.

It used to be that computer nerds were interested in computers as a hobby - programming, OS fundamentals, etc, they would learn it all so they could improve their lives and the lives of others through automation. And writing software is just generally cool. Everything from the demoscene to hackers to pirates to corporate coders and business types all had a mutual understanding and respect for the technology. They understood it, knew it's implications for the future, and wanted to use it to improve the world. The focus was on the implications of the technology, rather than the specific devices or companies making devices - a computer was a computer, and while each geek might have their favourite version (the Amiga for instance), they were usually more interested in the general community and the technology at a more fundamental level.

Now it's all about technological toys, vapid consumerism, and attention seeking. People used to buy an expensive phone with lots of features because they liked the ability to take notes and it would improve their workflow. They could integrate it with their existing computer system to do things like view and send emails. Now people buy an expensive phone because it has a glass back, and will improve their status amongst their friends group for 2 months until the next gadget comes out. Your average geek today knows absolutely nothing about the technology they use, they simply consume it and move on. People also see technology the same way they see politics - rather than caring about the societal implications and uses of smartphones, it's all about Apple vs Android, the latest Apple device and how it's "going to change the landscape" and how "Samsung will need to catch up" (usually by releasing a product that is as bad or worse - Samsung is probably the only company worse than Apple at this point). The tech race fluff has come to the forefront.

Even professional coders these days don't know a lot. Thanks to the shifting software landscape, corporations would now rather hire bottom-of-the-barrel remote workers in countries like India or Malaysia rather than hiring a competent local programmer, which is why even basic websites now require 30-100MB of javascript frameworks just to function, and everything is written in garbage like TypeScript (the only language worse than JavaScript). This is relevant (it's not just a rant on bad coders) because it sets the standard for technology - when nothing works properly (you've probably noticed in the last decade doing literally anything with a computer, phone or other device is unnecessarily difficult and error prone), and when everything is so inherently complicated it takes a 3000 page book to explain it, of course geeks aren't going to take the time to learn it. They might explore the surface-level stuff like coding a GUI in a high level language, but the underlying backend is so crusty, so badly maintained, and so unnecessarily complicated that it's painful to learn, so they don't bother.

And yes, gatekeeping to a certain extent is good. It can be bad when it reaches a level of elitism, but for the most part, people should be expected to show genuine interest in something before people will take their advice or accept them as a genuine member of anything, especially if they want to make changes.

Split screen gaming too has extremely declined. Which is a shame because I always found it more fun to play with someone next to me. I have so many good memories from that, and while doing it online with a mic is still fun, the exprience doesn't compare. Lot of laughs I had were because there were people around me which resulted in some very funny moments. I remember atacking my brother with tickles after losing from him or sharing chips with friends during a game. That is impossible digitally.
You can't sell a game twice (or even up to 4 times) if it can be played split screen! I used to go to my friends house frequently for "Halo Days" where we would have 6-8 people all playing in a big System Link game. We had a total of 2 copies of Halo 2. Microsoft never made a cent off me. That's unacceptable in the "everything needs to be a live service and be monetized forever" game industry model we are currently in.
 
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InsufferableCynic

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This definitely predates the iPhone and Web 2.0, and can probably be blamed entirely on Wired magazine.
Ehh, I don't think many of the retarded tech consumers that exist nowadays have even heard of Wired magazine.

The iPhone was certainly a contender - it made smartphones "cool" so now everyone wanted one so they could download the fart noise app rather than being purely business devices based around productivity.

Microsoft has also been at the forefront of this for a while too. Windows has never been sold on productivity. I mean it pretends to be - all their ads are always about "being more productive" in Microsoft Office on some new version of Windows, but at the end of the day, the features that sell the OS are usually "it's newer" or people talk about some peripheral feature (I remember people bought Vista because of the nice looking glass UI, a UI which I still personally think looks better than any other version of Windows, even if Vista is an unmitigated trainwreck of an OS). This also often happens because people buy a new laptop, it comes with a new version of Windows, that new version is usually tangibly worse than the old one, so they make up ad-hoc rationalizations for why they like the new one more.

Honestly though, I think it's just intellectual laziness. Millennials and Zoomers have basically been brought up with instant gratification - everything can be delivered instantly on an app, any and all work is to be avoided if possible, and learning is that annoying thing you have to do before you can have the REAL fun making money by doing almost nothing at an office job. This mindset actively creates consoomers, and in terms of tech geeks it means people will never bother to dig deeper or learn how everything works. They will simply buy the product with the most "features", and will take the hype that the next version will be a "game changer" that "revolutionizes the way you live your life" at face value. This is also exactly why there are so many scam water-from-air devices and miraculous transport solutions floating around on the internet. It's also Musks entire business model. Intellectually lazy young people would rather get wrapped up in hype and the possibility of "doing anything in the future" than actually learning anything, which leaves them open to being scammed, locked in by greedy companies, and to buy gadgets and devices they don't need.

Just look at tablets. They are literally, completely pointless. There's really only 1 or 2 use cases where tablets make sense instead of a phone or a laptop. These are niche uses like reading a book in bed, or watching YouTube on the couch (and even then, thats what everyone has a smart TV for). Now after the ipad craze of 2010, they are dying out because everyone realised they are useless. The same thing will happen to smart watches and all the other "cool tech geek" devices eventually, so the future isn't too dark at least. On a related note, I think Smart Fridges win the award for most pointless device ever made.

At the end of the day, geek culture in it's current form is a game we mutually play. Corporations play the part of locking us into an ecosystem and drip-feeding us features and updates to extract as much money as possible, and we play the part of getting excited and throwing around massive amounts of disposable income when these small iterations are announced. Most of the hype around Apple products doesn't come from Apple, it comes from the Apple fanboys and the community.