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Dreamcast and Y2K Game Aesthetics

vaporwavemaster1

Eccojamming Emperor
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はい、夢のキャストは常に蒸気波シーンで人気のコンソールでした。初期のリリースであるドリームキャストの夏の曲は、ドリームキャストにインスパイアされたアートワークを多用しています。夢のキャストがなぜ蒸気波を助長するのか正確にはわかりません-それはおそらく、シーマンゲームのようなそこにあるすべての奇妙でシュールなゲームと関係があります。

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Vaporweeb

Well-Known Traveler
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はい、夢のキャストは常に蒸気波シーンで人気のコンソールでした。初期のリリースであるドリームキャストの夏の曲は、ドリームキャストにインスパイアされたアートワークを多用しています。夢のキャストがなぜ蒸気波を助長するのか正確にはわかりません-それはおそらく、シーマンゲームのようなそこにあるすべての奇妙でシュールなゲームと関係があります。

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I agree. The experimental nature of many Dreamcast games is a fascinating thing to look back on. Certainly, nobody else was doing anything like Seaman, as per your example. To those unaware, coming across bizarre games like that piques their interest in a "that was a thing?!" sort of way.

In addition, we all know that the very name "vaporwave" is derived from the term "vaporware," and while the Dreamcast itself isn't technically vaporware (real vaporware is never released at all, of course), I have to wonder if its lack of commercial success contributes to its popularity on the scene. Combined with the nostalgia of those who did have a Dreamcast, there might be a sort of desire to share with the world what they missed out on (tying back to my point about people not knowing anything about the Dreamcast). Indeed, to this day I believe the Dreamcast was unfairly misaligned, and it's a shame that it's mostly known today as a failure.

Anyway, I also adore the look of Dreamcast games (and the Y2K aesthetic as a whole) and hope more creators explore it in the future. :)

View: https://youtu.be/n86xEwVdocc
 
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atebitnate

New Traveler
I agree. The experimental nature of many Dreamcast games is a fascinating thing to look back on. Certainly, nobody else was doing anything like Seaman, as per your example. To those unaware, coming across bizarre games like that piques their interest in a "that was a thing?!" sort of way.

In addition, we all know that the very name "vaporwave" is derived from the term "vaporware," and while the Dreamcast itself isn't technically vaporware (real vaporware is never released at all, of course), I have to wonder if its lack of commercial success contributes to its popularity on the scene. Combined with the nostalgia of those who did have a Dreamcast, there might be a sort of desire to share with the world what they missed out on (tying back to my point about people not knowing anything about the Dreamcast). Indeed, to this day I believe the Dreamcast was unfairly misaligned, and it's a shame that it's mostly known today as a failure.

Anyway, I also adore the look of Dreamcast games (and the Y2K aesthetic as a whole) and hope more creators explore it in the future. :)

View: https://youtu.be/n86xEwVdocc
I think that's certainly part of it, but I also think it's safe to say SEGA managed to tap into some aesthetics that were really trendy at the time. Whether it be the music, graphics, the overall design of the console or even the menu. Aside from being ahead of its time with the second screen and online play, it managed to capture a cultural zeitgeist that has yet be recreated by a singular gaming console.

Everyone talked about the PS2 and loved it, but in the end the brand is what carried it into stardom and created the mass amount of clout that would spawn its iconic library. Again no hate for the PS2, it's one of the greatest consoles of al time. Yet the Dreamcast wasn't just a question of what could have been for the sake of nostalgia, it was a statement about the style of the time and it managed to grasp at things that would eventually become commonplace for technology as well as gameplay. It really was a marvel of a console that took a lot of risks!

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