What's new
  • Donate and support Agora Road's Macintosh Cafe to keep the forum alive and make any necessary upgrades to have a more pleasant experience! In addition, you will be able to have "moods" enabled on your profile and have donation only awards! Update: I configured the site with Brave Browser, so you can send tips to the site with BAT.

    You can now donate directly to the forum without signing up for patreon. You will still have all of the same perks in patreon but its now one less sign up method. It will be under Account Upgrades

    This is the submission thread for the 2nd E-zine! Please use the dropbox linke for submissions and bump the thread with ideas, comments, statements, or just to bump. If you want to submit your stories or whatever you want to the second edition.

Flower Pressing

  • Thread starter Punp
  • Start date
  • This thread has been viewed 64 times.

Punp

Traveler
Joined
Aug 4, 2022
Messages
116
Reaction score
267
Awards
55
Sometimes I need to get away from the computer so I can rest my hands. I enjoy going out into my garden, but before I had a garden I'd go out into the wild, abandoned areas of my neighbourhood and observe and gather flowers. It really helped me to ground myself in what was otherwise a very overwhelming time for me.

For harvesting flowers, you should know what the laws are in the place you live. In the UK it's legal to take cuttings and seeds of plants, but not the whole plant or the roots. To be on the safe side, I use the mantra: take what is plentiful, don't kill anything. Also note that insects and small mammals will be using flowers, their pollen and nectar as a food source, so don't over harvest.

Cut flowers above where two leaves split. This will encourage the plant to continue growing.

Next you take your collected flowers and plant cuttings to your preparation area. The aim is to make them as dry and flat as possible. Shake them and inspect them for insects. Remove insects if there are any.

Put your flowers flat onto tissue or toilet paper and cover it with another piece of paper. It's best if this paper is unpatterend so it doesn't imprint onto your flowers.

Fold two pieces of A4 paper in half. Put the tissue paper inside one, and then use the other to cover the first one like this <=> so that the flowers are contained on the left and right.

Next place your flowers under a pile of books. Leave them there for a few days and then come back and inspect your flowers. Use tweezers to separate the flowers delicately from the paper to prevent them tearing.

Change the paper for newer, drier, flat paper if it has wrinkled. Throw away anything that is too wet or has speckles of mould - it may affect the rest of the collection.

Press it again for another week or so. It's fine to leave things in a book case and forget.

When you're done, put the flowers into sealed bags so as to prevent infestation or cross contamination from fungal spores. (I learned this the hard way). Store it in a box somewhere dry with good air circulation.

I hope this helps. Please post pics of what you press!

WARNING: SOME FLOWERS ARE POISONOUS, AND IT'S OFTEN ONES YOU WOULDN'T EXPECT. REMEMBER TO WASH YOUR HANDS AFTER HANDLING YOUR FLOWERS.
 
Last edited:
Virtual Cafe Awards

zalaz alaza

hawaiin burger genie 5.04 LTS
Bronze
Joined
Dec 7, 2021
Messages
244
Reaction score
373
Awards
75
Website
zalazalaza.xyz
Sometimes I need to get away from the computer so I can rest my hands. I enjoy going out into my garden, but before I had a garden I'd go out into the wild, abandoned areas of my neighbourhood and observe and gather flowers. It really helped me to ground myself in what was otherwise a very overwhelming time for me.

For harvesting flowers, you should know what the laws are in the place you live. In the UK it's legal to take cuttings and seeds of plants, but not the whole plant or the roots. To be on the safe side, I use the mantra: take what is plentiful, don't kill anything. Also note that insects and small mammals will be using flowers, their pollen and nectar as a food source, so don't over harvest.

Cut flowers above where two leaves split. This will encourage the plant to continue growing.

Next you take your collected flowers and plant cuttings to your preparation area. The aim is to make them as dry and flat as possible. Shake them and inspect them for insects. Remove insects if there are any.

Put your flowers flat onto tissue or toilet paper and cover it with another piece of paper. It's best if this paper is unpatterend so it doesn't imprint onto your flowers.

Fold two pieces of A4 paper in half. Put the tissue paper inside one, and then use the other to cover the first one like this <=> so that the flowers are contained on the left and right.

Next place your flowers under a pile of books. Leave them there for a few days and then come back and inspect your flowers. Use tweezers to separate the flowers delicately from the paper to prevent them tearing.

Change the paper for newer, drier, flat paper if it has wrinkled. Throw away anything that is too wet or has speckles of mould - it may affect the rest of the collection.

Press it again for another week or so. It's fine to leave things in a book case and forget.

When you're done, put the flowers into sealed bags so as to prevent infestation or cross contamination from fungal spores. (I learned this the hard way). Store it in a box somewhere dry with good air circulation.

I hope this helps. Please post pics of what you press!
Im going to do so many flowers this year! Have you ever preserved them in anything thick, like a clear epoxy?
 
Virtual Cafe Awards

Punp

Traveler
Joined
Aug 4, 2022
Messages
116
Reaction score
267
Awards
55
Im going to do so many flowers this year! Have you ever preserved them in anything thick, like a clear epoxy?
No, but you'd want to press them dry first in something absorbant. The quicker you can dry the flowers, the better they'll keep and the more vivid the colours.

Once they're pressed you can do whatever you like with them. If you're using epoxy you should pour it slowly and agitate the mould to get the bubbles out.
 
Virtual Cafe Awards