Introversion and extroversion

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Yabba

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Introversion shouldn't indicate antisocial behavior or social anxiety, we're social creatures but unlike extroverts introverts don't enjoy spending every waking moment with someone else. I think there's nothing wrong with that. Sometimes you just want to enjoy an activity by yourself or think things through or just relax alone.
So in that case is everyone an introvert, cause I've never met a person that didn't want some alone time. Also wanting to be alone is antisocial behavior by definition because it goes directly against being social. Of course that doesn't mean that's a bad thing, and it's definitely normal to feel that way sometimes.
 
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imnotdeadyet

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So in that case is everyone an introvert, cause I've never met a person that didn't want some alone time.
I know some that can't stand to be alone pretty much any waking moment, but they're definitely an extreme outlier. It's ultimately supposed to be a "social battery" thing, like "feeling energized" when you're around and hanging out with people. It's not impossible that a large portion of people lean more one way or the other. I think most people aren't extreme on either side.
Also wanting to be alone is antisocial behavior by definition because it goes directly against being social.
I mean you aren't wrong it is asocial behavior, I just don't think it's something to call someone asocial over.
 
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Taleisin

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Also wanting to be alone is antisocial behavior by definition because it goes directly against being social
I mean you aren't wrong it is asocial behavior, I just don't think it's something to call someone asocial over.
Antisocial means preventing the social behaviour of others. Asocial means not-social, which is more accurate, however it's an absolute term so it would usually only be applied if someone was never social ever. You're looking for non-social.

Sorry I can't stand people being both pedantic and wrong at the same time. ;)
 
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imnotdeadyet

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Yabba

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Antisocial means preventing the social behaviour of others. Asocial means not-social, which is more accurate, however it's an absolute term so it would usually only be applied if someone was never social ever. You're looking for non-social.

Sorry I can't stand people being both pedantic and wrong at the same time. ;)
Sorry, I guess I was using the wrong word this entire time but, wouldn't you not being social make it ever so harder for others to be social as they have less options. I'm not saying that being an introvert isn't asocial. By your definition it definitely is, I'm just curious if it could still somewhat barely be considered antisocial.
 
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Taleisin

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Sociality of a person: hyper-social, social, minimally social, asocial, antisocial (descending order).
Sociality of an action: Pro-social, social, non-social, antisocial.

An antisocial action is like, smashing shop windows or leaving piles of shit in the street. An antisocial person is a sociopath. The common usage of "antisocial" is usually inaccurate.

Anti- meaning against, A- meaning not, Pro- meaning for/encouraging, hyper- meaning greatly/excessively
 
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I don't think terms like "introvert" and "extrovert" are good ways to look at people - in general, I don't think any word being invented and popularized in the last two hundred years is. I may be called "naive", but I keep seeing everywhere online long posts of people self-describing as "introverts" that nevertheless manage to write long paragraphs about themselves, and do so confidently enough to sincerely expose their personality online without fearing a judgement of others that could, very easily, turn cruel. A person who craves for isolation and refuses to let himself be seen by others would simply never do that, it wouldn't even cross his mind in the same way it wouldn't cross his mind to go out to the street naked. So I think, in most cases, it's contextual: I think most people who could be described as introverted are only so because the appropriate contexts were they would feel comforting and, dare I say, rewarding to interact with others are just gone, or were never there, or had been distorted and twisted as time went by. In any case, it's not a label that could be given in fairness, not even to oneself.