Post-Y2k; What Came Next?

Still a Youth

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So it doesn't really need to be explained, but since this is an "old web" forum centered around y2k-era internet aesthetics, there's a particular style and frame of reference in which one approaches the site. The main attraction is "see how the web used to be". However, "used to be" is past tense, implying that the internet is not that way anymore. So this raises the question. Chronologically speaking, we're currently "post-y2k" but the internet has gone through many rapid changes. The internet today, however you want to characterize it, has changed a bit since both y2k, and whatever anteceded y2k. So the question here is this: what is the 'post-y2k' web. What are the aesthetic, and use case changes that characterize the "post-y2k" era?
To clarify, I am not talking about "what does the internet look like today?" Everyone knows what discord, tiktok, >redditcostanzayeahrightsmirk, etc., look like now, you just need to visit the site. The question I'm asking is more along the lines of "what did the internet look like after the y2k era, but which can still be considered "old web"?
 
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MindControlBoxer

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Frutiger genius



 
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Chuffed

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Message boards were a thing.
Flash games and animations can probably count toward post y2k now that they are gone.
Internet Explorer was your browser with Netscape gone... Firefox came on to the scene at some point too.
Chat programs... Yahoo everything... eBay was big.

I guess to sum it up, borrows what optimism and jankiness we can from this time period and apply it now 8).
 
google material m3 tries to push their artstyle, but nobody but them, and android, uses that; speaking of side on corpos side
 
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Alixie Shukshin

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2004-2009 maybe? The web was starting to get centralized yet remains of the old web were still around, the Internet was gaining a lot of popularity, first years of Frutiger Aero, etc...
Speaking about early Frutiger Aero, I love it. Windows Longhorn especially, the UI is gorgeous. (some images attached below)
 

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Deleted member 7044

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Post Y2K was ~2004/5-2013. Back when Frutiger Aero became the design norm of the time for various things in technology, and there was still a more positive outlook with technology and the world. It's also when centralized, now mainstream, social media platforms took off, but well before they had the negative view and various issues they have now. During this time personal websites still existed widely, though I've noticed that this time was when a shift to blogs began with things like WordPress. Somehow personal sites, niche sites, and centralized platforms, and everything else all coexisted together and were designed well in general.

As for Frutiger Aero I wish that it stayed around longer, or at the least was easier to make things look like it again. It's much more pleasant on the eyes than minimalism.
 
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2004-2009 maybe? The web was starting to get centralized yet remains of the old web were still around, the Internet was gaining a lot of popularity, first years of Frutiger Aero, etc...
Speaking about early Frutiger Aero, I love it. Windows Longhorn especially, the UI is gorgeous. (some images attached below)
Man longhorn and vista had such style back then. What happened?
 
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I don't like the simplified modern web and how awful and bland it looks. Some consider it to be "cleaner" but I want more value in my screen real estate.

The trend is towards simplification and while it does produce cleaner sites, there is a certain wholesomeness to a site built as much as possible to be useful and efficient with your time and screen space. I took a few classes in college on UX design, and have spoken to several UX people and they tend to be particular bout the design of websites.

Things that make sense to me because I want a utilitarian site, don't make sense to them because they want a site that looks really good.
 
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I don't like the simplified modern web and how awful and bland it looks. Some consider it to be "cleaner" but I want more value in my screen real estate.

The trend is towards simplification and while it does produce cleaner sites, there is a certain wholesomeness to a site built as much as possible to be useful and efficient with your time and screen space. I took a few classes in college on UX design, and have spoken to several UX people and they tend to be particular bout the design of websites.

Things that make sense to me because I want a utilitarian site, don't make sense to them because they want a site that looks really good.
Ironically "minimalist" websites are some of the most bloated and can barely run on computers that should be able to run simple shapes with no depth.
 
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