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Your Family's Belief In The Paranormal

kultra

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Yes. Paternal side believes in spooks (aka DEMONZ are the cause of ALL SUPERNATURAL THINGS) and it sure as hell rubbed off on me but I'm more rational about it. One time my dad thought a demon-pretending-to-be-smelly-ghost was in the house because I was creating, uh, fancy smells with my at the time hobby. Then my mom told me holes would rot through my hands if I fantasized while praying or in church and being 9 I figured that meant if my brain zapped randomly to ps2 in church I was doomed. Then I learned what fantasizing really meant and of course suddenly couldn't stop doing that shit either so i was double-d00med.

Turned out mostly weird but I'm high functioning weird thanks to that
 
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temporaltaboo

I was born to immigrant Christian parents so their belief in the supernatural was pretty much guaranteed -- my mom talked about voodoo magicks and how they affected us pretty often. She believed that her dreams could predict the future... and to give her credit, they often did.

Despite Christianity generally forbidding magic as blasphemous, I noticed a lot of culture from third world countries mix their own native beliefs with Christianity and it was nice to see a first-hand example via relatives.

It's ironic since as we grew older, my folk become less spiritual whereas I became more invested in spirituality, so much so I started digging through Frater K's library on the /OMG/ threads that pop up on /x/ from time to time and even bought books concerning the subject matter.

Overall, probably a schizo/schizo LARPer in denial at this rate.
 

Coton

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My mother swear she had seen ghosts in a house we used to live in. And i can't argue, this house was definitely weird.

So yes she believe in ghosts and all that, but she is kind of a hippie, not religious at all so.. It's not a surprise


My great grandpa is currently on his deathbed due to cancer and he seems rather stoic about it, I kinda want to ask him how he feels about dying soon but I don't know how to go about it.
Be strong fellow traveller
 
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Neonriser

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My mum said I once saw the ghost of Pa (my mother's father) and took me out on various adventures, but I don't remember unfortunately.
 
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TigrEncounter

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I'm curious as to what extent your family believed in the paranormal and how much it rubbed off onto you during your upbringing. Were that any paranormal experiences from your childhood that you told them about? How did they react?

I find that most parents, no matter how straight-laced, will adopt some kind of belief in positive/negative spirits, guardian angels, ghosts (especially those of relatives who've passed) etc after the birth of their kids.

In my instance, my mother swore that every picture she took of me before I left on a Boy Scout trip had "orbs" in them, which she felt were protective spirits.
It's not a family belief, more likely mine and my sister's belief. My grandfather who married my grandma ruined his life by lying countless of times inside the family. She went on and cheated on him and brought up a gypsy kid and gave it to him like 'its your child'. Since then everything went downhill. My grandfather died the year I was born due to alcoholism and depression. The same fate took my father this year in a similiar age (50) due to his depression losing grandpa when I was about to born.

And I beleive this is a curse. Thanks to grandma bringing up a gypsy cunt who's my uncle even worsened my dad's life. And I know as long as they are alive. My bloodline is cursed. He was the guy who never made a dime he just stole and stole and stole. Made it into a succesful band by accident and living off of that money. Even after my dad died he took his car because it 'wasnt on his name'. The next time I see him im going to spin that son of a bitch's jaw.
 
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partyingwithpizza

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Both my parents maintained that nothing paranormal existed while I was growing up. They still believe that for the most part, but one time my mom acknowledged that at an old house they lived in before I was born, they would hear footsteps up and down the hall at night. She doesn't believe that ghosts were the cause though, but she acknowledges it was weird and unexplainable. My interest in the paranormal rubbed off on me from my sister. Although our parents didn't believe in the paranormal, we both enjoyed scary movies and books which led us to become interested.
 
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Jade

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one thing he was telling me recently was about the Nephilim of the bible, and how these were the basis for Greco-Roman demigods (or demigods in general). the bible explains that angels came down from heaven and fucked the earth women and their offspring were "men of great power and renown"....like Perseus...or Jesus...etc.
Is he at all familiar with Indo-European studies and comparative mythology?
 
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manpaint

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My mom claimed to have seen a ghost once. As for myself I generally don't believe in the paranormal. I did have one spooky thing happen to me though. One night I was very sad, and possibly contemplating depression. I then heard some kind of eldritch scream as if it was a warning from God saying "You are forbidden to end your life". The scream sounded like a very slow and distorded raven sound.

Since I was in my bed, I think the most logic answer is that I simply had a very weird nightmare. I often have very imaginative dream.

A replica of the scream I once made for a game is attached to this post if you are curious (sound is in OGG).
 

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My mother is pretty skeptical like me. Even though we are devout christians, we are very skeptical of demons spooking people because it makes no sense. The first thing you do after having a creepy demon encounter or whatever is going to repent and confess. A pretty low IQ move from Satan. Demons, if they interact actively with us at all, would turn themselves into something very attractive to humans. Like politics. Have you guys read Demons by Dostoevski?

5695.jpg


My dad is somewhat more 'superstitious', he does believe in demons doing spoopy stuff against people. He is convinced a demon scared him when he was a child.

My grandparents from my dad's side are superstitious af. The 2016 elections in here ended up being a progressive Trudeau-esque dude vs an evangelist. When the evangelist lost, my grandpa believed the prog made a deal with the devil to give him the election. My grandparents are also the kind of people who believe in 'claiming' things from God and putting holy oil in your head or around the house to bless it.

My 100-year-old great grandma is not all that coherent anymore... But when she still was, she swore she encountered a bunch of local folklore demon things from Costa Rica. Like La Tule Vieja, El Cadejos, La Llorona, etc.

My recently deceased uncle, from my father's side, was prone to using alternative medicine stuff quite a bit. Nothing crazy, but he always carried around oils that could influence your mood. He even had some of those in his possessions when he died, so I guess they were important to him.

I don't have any crazy paranormal beliefs and the closest thing I've had to a paranormal encounter was feeling class on one of my hands. It happened one time while I lay in bed. Maybe I was dreaming or I accidentally summoned a Tulpa idk.

I don't think being skeptical is necessarily a good thing, I'm just biased in a very different way to those family members I've mentioned.
 
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mydadiscar

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My mother believes that aliens exist due to the fact that the universe is so large that it is impossible that we are the only inhabited planet/intelligent lifeform in the universe. I agree with her reasoning. That is the only paranormal belief I am aware of any of my family members having. Excluding myself, of course.
 
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Sinthôme

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My granddad who was an immigrant from an island off the West coast of Connacht, Ireland, would tell me all about the fairy folk and the myths and legends that had been passed down to him. Taught me some things in Irish, too. He was homeless in the late years of his life (because of mental illness, then later, dementia) so he basically lived in the Borders bookstore. None of his family received any education past the 3rd grade, but he was extremely literate and autodidactic, so he was always giving me specific books on the topic of Irish folklore and culture -- and the paranormal beliefs. The notable most story he had told me was about Tir na nÓg, (land of the young) which was a phantom island (further) off the Wild Atlantic Way, one which was shrouded in fog and only appeared visible at rare times, one which was one of many portals to the Otherworld. The fae could, if you were unfortunate or seduced enough, bring you the island, where you could experience all kinds of sublime and ineffable pleasures and dreams with the fair hosts. Yet even an hour spent on the island would be like a hundred years when you return, with everything and everyone you had ever known gone and dead. He told me all kinds of stuff about the fairies, and I learned more from those books. It's worth noting that the popular image of "fairies" is dead wrong. This is not Tinkerbell. These creatures are chaotic, unpredictable, mischeivous, and often dangerously malevolent. You wanted to avoid fucking with the fairies or encountering them as much as humanly possible. In fact, that is the entire heritage of the reasons for the custom: actions and ritual gestures to prevent encounters with the fairies because they were such a serious and pernicious threat to daily livelihood.

Putting aside the cartoon Disney version in modern understanding, the actual fairies as actually understood by the modern Celtic cultures (Ireland, Scotland, Wales, Breton), are almost identical in descriptions of the encounters (which is how the myth spread, after all) as to UFO's and alien abductions. Down to the last detail. The only thing that is different is of course, the cultural lens and symbols through which it is seen or interpreted in the zeitgeist. But the time dilation, the complete abduction of random farmers or wayward travelers only to drop them in some bizarre place and condition, perhaps days or years later (with aging differences, even), the bizarre and inhuman figures described, the dream-like nature of the encounter, things in the sky, strange little men, weather events heralding an encounter, tampering with biological material including crops and human fetuses, alternating malevolence or almost divine graciousness, and everything else. What's different is whether they're encountered in an indigenous 10th century Irish island or whether they are encountered in 20th century America in the midst of a technological revolution and a burgeoning mass media. Of course the event and indeed, the myth, would be interpreted through whatever happens to be the dominant cultural paradigm and way of comprehending such an incomprehensible thing. And even today many older people in Ireland, especially in the rural West which up until the 90's was much further behind the transformation to an industrialized country spreading out from Dublin and Leinster, take the fair folk at least moderately seriously. Remember: they are called "the fair folk" not because they are so "fair" (as in good, light) but because they are always listening. That was the level the culture was at. They are "fairies" because to call them otherwise would be a grave offense for creatures who lurk anywhere to snatch you up and away.

Anyway, my grandad knew as much as there was to know about this stuff, and he respected the culture of the homeland he left. He was naturally a skeptic, but a very literate one at that. I wouldn't say that he strictly "believed" in any of that, although Catholicism and the Church was important to him and his family, as well as my grandma.

My dad on the other hand -- an innately skeptical, strictly empiricist ( yet still open when it counts I think) PhD. biologist -- from a young age, I would get into long debates with him where he would argue that lucid dreaming was "scientifically imossible" and "cultish New Age hogwash" even though I was trying to show him the recent-ish groundbreaking sleep science by Stephen LaBerge and more important tell him my own experiences having been a natural and frequent lucid dreamer for literally all of my life and describing that to him. He would not believe it on the grounds that there would be no way of knowing whether you actually experienced it or simply imagined it and reconstructed it upon waking. I understood then and understand now the logical parameters of that argument, but it's bullshit. Stephen LaBerge in the 70's had trained dreamers hooked up to EEG machines and eyelid monitors giving coded eye signals in real time to produce a stimulus from inside their dream to demonstrate this. But I really felt like the kind of skepticism my father was giving me then was the worst kind -- precisely because it was so useless. It was a falsehood. He was telling me that he did not believe the veracity of my experience for, really, no other reason than he himself had not experienced it. And then telling himself that it was his logical imperative to do so. That seems to be the worst kind of "skepticism": what is really just materialism and reduction -- I cannot see therefore I do not believe. It's not complex thought, it is stupidly simple: "I cannot admit the possibility of your experience because I cannot see it myself."

Anyway, sorry for rambling, but I enjoyed hearing the other responses here.
 
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